i wrote this article 10 years ago, but it is still applicable today when scoring and teaching the lifts.

The Coach's Office



Feature Article: Maxing Out in the Power Clean Using
the 10 Point Scale

Written by Mike Burgener, CSCS, Level 4 Olympic Coach


As a Strength Coach at the High School level as well as the Head Coach of Team Southern
California, I am always bombarded with requests to lift maximum weights. With beginners I don't
like to test. I prefer to teach technique and I believe that the max's will increase with technique
improvement. Try as I may, kids still want to be tested!! Therefore, I developed a 10 point scale
emphasizing technique. The 10 point scale makes athletes concerned with proper technique during
testing sessions. If an athlete lifts, for example, 100 kilograms in the power clean and is graded with
a 8 or higher, the athlete is credited with the lift and may attempt a heavier weight. However, if the
athlete is graded with a 7 or lower, the lift is not credited and the last weight in which he received a
8 is credited. Of course, the athlete can attempt the lift again, especially if the score was a 6 or 7. If
the lift was less than 6, the athlete would be given no additional attempts with that weight.

I use the 10 point scale with my P-E classes as well as my Olympic lifters in establishing workout
loads and intensities. I have found that it has benefited all of the kids that adhere to the system. It is
fun to watch my athletes use the 10 point scale during practice sessions. They have come
accustomed to yelling out loudly: "6!!! " or what ever they feel the lift is to be awarded. This allows
for technique competition among the lifters as well as allowing them to realize that the main
emphasis in teaching the power related movements is technique, not the amount of weight they can
lift. They come to understand rather quickly that when technique improves, so does the amount of
weight lifted.

Here are the criteria for the 10 point scale of the power clean. You can make your own scale
based on your teaching and coaching methods.


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Copyright © 1995 Kim Roseland. All rights reserved.
Last updated November 21, 1995

Figure 1. The set-up.

Criteria for Scoring

Chest up, back tight and flat as possible,
shoulders over the bar.
1 point


Figures [ 2 ] [ 3 ] [ 4 ] [ 5 ] [ 6 ]

Table 1. The 10-Point Scale
Points
Phase
Criteria for Scoring
1
Set up
( Figure 1 )
Chest up, back tight and flat as possible, shoulders over the
bar.
2
Lift off
( Figure 2 )
First move with the legs, with most weight on heels, shoulders
over the bar, same back angle.
2
To the power zone
(approx. knee height)
( Figure 3 )
Hips and legs rise at the same speed, keeping the back angle
same as during set up and lift-off.
2
Explosion phase
(From knee height
to top position)
( Figure 4 )
Keep bar close to the body with elbows high, while getting full
extension.
3
Rack and recovery
( Figure 5 and
Figure 6 )
1 point - elbows up and bar resting on shoulders;
1 point - receiving bar with bent knees and above parallel;
1 point - receiving bar with rear back and back tight.
Total 10 points
Must get 8 or better to increase weight



Feature Article
The Coach's Office
HomePage


Copyright © 1995 Kim Roseland. All rights reserved.
Last updated November 21, 1995